Five Types of Fundraising Participants

  The Shy Ones   They can barely make eye contact, let alone make a fundraising sale. Or so they thought. To make them more comfortable and confident, ensure they know WHY your group is fundraising and the value of what you’re selling.

The Shy Ones

They can barely make eye contact, let alone make a fundraising sale. Or so they thought. To make them more comfortable and confident, ensure they know WHY your group is fundraising and the value of what you’re selling.

  The Eager Ones   You haven’t even passed out the fundraising materials and they’re already so excited to get started! To prolong that “kickoff high” and keep up the selling momentum, provide “progress” updates on reaching your goal throughout the fundraiser.

The Eager Ones

You haven’t even passed out the fundraising materials and they’re already so excited to get started! To prolong that “kickoff high” and keep up the selling momentum, provide “progress” updates on reaching your goal throughout the fundraiser.

  The Unmotivated Ones   Whether they’re a little lazy or just really busy, they can’t be bothered to fundraise. If everyone else participates it won’t matter, right? Wrong! Every dollar earned helps, so to encourage even the most unmotivated consider implementing some low tier incentives.

The Unmotivated Ones

Whether they’re a little lazy or just really busy, they can’t be bothered to fundraise. If everyone else participates it won’t matter, right? Wrong! Every dollar earned helps, so to encourage even the most unmotivated consider implementing some low tier incentives.

  The Top-Selling Ones   Between their ambition and their family’s connection within the community, they ALWAYS end up being a fundraising top-seller. Give them props and help “spread the wealth” by inviting them to share some tips and tricks with other participants.

The Top-Selling Ones

Between their ambition and their family’s connection within the community, they ALWAYS end up being a fundraising top-seller. Give them props and help “spread the wealth” by inviting them to share some tips and tricks with other participants.

  The Grown-Up Ones   They’re not big kids, they’re actually the moms and dads of your participants with jobs and other responsibilities. While some help from parents is expected, ultimately whether a family participates and how much they sell should be up to their son or daughter.

The Grown-Up Ones

They’re not big kids, they’re actually the moms and dads of your participants with jobs and other responsibilities. While some help from parents is expected, ultimately whether a family participates and how much they sell should be up to their son or daughter.

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